TEXAS TOY MAN

Toys of Yesterday and Today
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Frankenstein

 

 

 

Ever since the introduction of GI Joe as an action figure for boys ( and no, they’re not dolls), the toy industry has taken to manufacturing other types of figures that have appeal either because they are action-related or they represent popular movie figures. The Star Wars figures  are an excellent example of a huge success of manufacturing figures from a movie – or in this case movies.  To view i

The earliest Frankenstein movie came to the big screen in 1910 (Edison Film Co.) with one of the most memorable ones being produced in 1931 by universal starring Boris Karloff. One of the most interesting Frankenstein figures you’ll find dating to these early years is one comprised of both tin lithograph and fabric. He was a battery-op item and when turned on would drop his pants.

This much later version of a Frankenstein figure pictured here is dated 1973 which leads me to think it may have come out after the 1973 production starring James Mason, David McCallum and Jane Seymour – titled Frankenstein: The True Story (Universal UK). Although I don’t know that for a fact.

Should you happen to come across a similar figure, the following features are relevant to this Frankenstein:

 

Figure is 8″ tall

Introduced in 1974

Marked on back :

Universal City (copyright mark) Studio 1973

Azrak-Hamway

In.Ink

NY.NY

Made in Hong Kong 6126

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Interestingly this figure is quite mobile. His head turns, arms and legs move, with his waist, knees, ankles and elbows being jointed. He came dressed in black pants, jacket and gray pullover – however, I can’t say that these are original.

Collecting movie memorabilia can be a fun, challenging hobby – and I’m guessing Frankenstein would be right at the top. And, if you’re looking for a good reference, take a look at some of these Character Price Guides available on Amazon.

 

 

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Posted in Action Figures and Vintage Toys 4 years, 11 months ago at 4:04 pm.

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